NUPGE Retirees

The National Union of Public and General Employees has a large and growing pool of active retirees who make a powerful, political force across the country.

Bigger, Stronger

The number of retirees is going to accelerate dramatically over the next several decades as baby boomers begin turning 65. About one million union members could retire in the next 10 years and today's retirees are living a lot longer than past generations. They are healthier, more mobile and more active in their communities.

Political Clout

More retirees mean more voice on public policy issues that are important to the labour movement, union retirees and all seniors. Retirees are engaging in politics; they show up to vote and they form an increasingly larger share of the voter turnout. The percentage of the growing senior population that votes leads by far any other age group. If trend lines continue, retirees will be a dominate force in future elections.

Staying Active

Many retirees helped build the union when they were working. Despite officially leaving the workforce, many want to stay connected or involved in union issues and campaigns. Retirees also need a voice to respond to the constant threat to social programs and benefits on which they will rely in the coming years (pension, employer-sponsored health benefits).

On the National Front

In 2010, the National Union created a national committee (National Union Action on Retiree Concerns, NUARC) to work wth our Component retiree divisions and to encourage the on going participation of our retirees at the national level. NUPGE will continue to make connections with retiree and seniors' organizations that share our common issues and concerns. This website will act as a gathering place for information about issues of concern to retirees within and outside the labour movement.

In addition, through the National Union and its Associate Membership Program, all retired NUPGE members have free access to discounted services, including extended health and dental coverage and home, auto and travel insurance.


Recent NUPGE stories

NUPGE urges the Conservative government to establish a Fairness Test to assess the distributional impact of key tax and spending policies in budgets and determine whether they will reduce income inequality or make the problem worse.

The National Union is encouraging all Canadians, especially those living in a Conservative riding to contact their MP to urge them to support this desperately needed housing strategy.  UPDATED

The rich and the rest of us: A northern forum on jobs, inequality, and the future of Ontario – January 8, 2013.

Sudbury (21 Dec. 2012) - Inequality is on the rise in Ontario. Wages are falling; profits are soaring. The poor are getting poorer, the middle class is shrinking and the top one per cent is getting a lot richer. The public services we all depend on are being slashed to pay for tax cuts for the richest corporations in the country.

We will be doing a disservice to our collective goal of achieving greater equality if all Canadians don't mount a spirited and vigorous offence in support of labour rights and unions.

"People know that when economic injustice and inequality exist, our families and our communities suffer. Economic well being is a human right that must be protected." - James Clancy, NUPGE National President.

“If we band together and act as one, we can change Walmart.”

"Walmart workers need to know that they are not alone in their fight for labour rights. At NUPGE, we know that labour rights are human rights." - James Clancy, NUPGE National President.

"To make a difference, Canadians need to pressure our government to take on the issue of income inequality head-on." - James Clancy, NUPGE National President.

This Labour Day in 2012, NUPGE celebrates the legacy of those who came before us and we commit to continue the fight for fairness.

"It is not the inexorable march of global economics alone, but rather choices – choices in public budgets, and in economic and social policy – that have failed to rein in the increasing income inequality distributed by the private market and aided in propelling us down this path."

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