NUPGE Retirees

The National Union of Public and General Employees has a large and growing pool of active retirees who make a powerful, political force across the country.

Bigger, Stronger

The number of retirees is going to accelerate dramatically over the next several decades as baby boomers begin turning 65. About one million union members could retire in the next 10 years and today's retirees are living a lot longer than past generations. They are healthier, more mobile and more active in their communities.

Political Clout

More retirees mean more voice on public policy issues that are important to the labour movement, union retirees and all seniors. Retirees are engaging in politics; they show up to vote and they form an increasingly larger share of the voter turnout. The percentage of the growing senior population that votes leads by far any other age group. If trend lines continue, retirees will be a dominate force in future elections.

Staying Active

Many retirees helped build the union when they were working. Despite officially leaving the workforce, many want to stay connected or involved in union issues and campaigns. Retirees also need a voice to respond to the constant threat to social programs and benefits on which they will rely in the coming years (pension, employer-sponsored health benefits).

On the National Front

In 2010, the National Union created a national committee (National Union Action on Retiree Concerns, NUARC) to work wth our Component retiree divisions and to encourage the on going participation of our retirees at the national level. NUPGE will continue to make connections with retiree and seniors' organizations that share our common issues and concerns. This website will act as a gathering place for information about issues of concern to retirees within and outside the labour movement.

In addition, through the National Union and its Associate Membership Program, all retired NUPGE members have free access to discounted services, including extended health and dental coverage and home, auto and travel insurance.


Recent NUPGE stories

"We’re calling on this government to deliver a transparent budget that protects the services Canadians rely on and scrap costly programs like new prisons and fighter jets that don’t reflect the priorities of mainstream Canada.”

CPP benefits increase by 2.8 percent effective January 2012: Yearly Maximum Pensionable Earnings (YMPE) for 2012 set at $50,100

“The CPP offers an already existing administrative structure and framework to improve retirement benefits for working Canadians at relatively low cost.”

“Canada does not need yet another voluntary tax-assisted retirement savings program. It needs public pensions that provide all Canadians with a basic guarantee of adequate income.”

RRSP system is one of Canada's most expensive social programs, costing the federal and provincial governments over $17 billion in foregone tax revenue

"Workers are being told to work longer, pay more and receive less," said James Clancy, NUPGE National President. "We stand in solidarity with each and every UNISON member in the fight for decent pensions. Enough is enough."

The Pension Protection Act moves pensioners to the front of the line of creditors to be paid out during bankruptcy

Many Canadians living pay cheque to pay cheque and unable to save, faced with the prospect of working longer before retirement.

The percentage of the labour force covered by a pension plan declined, from 34% in 1999 to 33% in 2009.

The CPP Fund's assets reached a record high of $148.2 billion at the end of its fiscal 2010. That surpassed a previous high of $127.7 billion in June 2008, months before the onset of the global financial downturn.

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