Social Impact Bonds | National Union of Public and General Employees

Social Impact Bonds

July 24, 2020

“Using social finance schemes like social impact bonds to privatize community and social services means funding that is desperately needed to help the most vulnerable people in our communities will end up in the pockets of lawyers, consultants and other intermediaries,” — Larry Brown, NUPGE President

June 25, 2020

The report is particularly timely, given how the COVID-19 pandemic has shown both the benefits of quality public services, and the huge price we pay when services are privatized. 

July 8, 2019

There are fears that the federal government's Social Finance Fund will be used to subsidize privatization schemes like Social Impact Bonds. This letter from NUPGE President Larry Brown to Jean-Yves Duclos, the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development asks the Minister to respond to comments that appear to originate with federal officials in recent media reports on the Social Finance Fund.

July 8, 2019

Unless the Minister completely rejects the idea that the Social Finance Fund will be used to "bring private funding, incentives and discipline into social services," past experience shows we need to assume that it will be used to subsidize the privatization of social services.

January 23, 2019

Those pushing social impact bonds are taking the same approach as those profiting from P3 privatization schemes – focus on the new service being provided and hope it distracts people from the problems with the way it’s being funded.

December 4, 2018

When social finance is used to privatize public services, costs go up. In addition to investor profits, using social finance to privatize public services means new layers of bureaucracy.

September 18, 2018

Making sure children aren’t hungry, making sure they can see properly in school, and making sure they get help if they lose a loved one shouldn’t depend on where wealthy individuals or corporations decide to invest.

May 18, 2018

Both projects sponsored by the Saskatchewan government show how Social Impact Bonds can be structured to exclude those who are hard to help.

April 9, 2018

What’s needed is for governments to provide community services with adequate funding. And a first step would be to ask the wealthy and large corporations to pay their share of taxes — instead of allowing them to profit from the misfortune of others by investing in social impact bonds.

July 28, 2017

"Treating social and public health services like they’re just another option for an investment portfolio is risky for everyone."  — Michelle Gawronsky, MGEU President