Corrections and Criminal Justice

Among the public sector members of the National Union are thousands of women and men who work in Canada’s justice system. These include Youth Corrections Professionals, Correctional Officers, Probation Officers, Sheriffs, as well as those who work in community-based social services, child protection, youth counsellors and other related social services.

These members of the National Union have a wealth of experience and knowledge that we believe can make an invaluable contribution to the development of public policy and legislation on criminal justice issues.


News on Corrections and Criminal Justice

April 5, 2016

“We will be looking for opportunities to move these issues forward and to work with the Minister and ministry staff to make these important improvements." — Stephanie Smith, BCGEU President

April 4, 2016

Warren (Smokey) Thomas said there was a big problem when senior managers lie to the minister.

March 23, 2016

OPSEU President, Warren (Smokey) Thomas said that Corrections Miniser Naqvi seemed "shocked to see the deplorable conditions inmates were living in — and correctional officers were working under. Clearly, something had to be done, and done quickly.”

March 22, 2016

"Our provincial prisons are increasingly violent for both the inmates and the men and women who work there. The problems cannot be ignored.” — Stephanie Smith, BCGEU President

March 22, 2016

“When our members delivered food services, the meals were safe and met health standards. Clearly, Compass can’t manage even that.” — Bob Bymoen, SGEU President

March 18, 2016

The current practice of forcing sheriffs to work overtime is not working and is unsustainable. The shortage is compromising courthouse security, delaying important proceedings, and is threatening the integrity of our justice system.

March 7, 2016

Survey results point to what the BCGEU/NUPGE has been saying: there is a poisonous work environment, chronically low staff morale and other significant problems that must be addressed. 

March 3, 2016

"This is not simply about inmates in a correctional facility or the people that work there — it is about the type of province we want to live in, the type of province we want to leave to our children.” — Jerry Earle, NAPE President

February 26, 2016

"Recognizing PTSD as a presumed workplace injury will ensure that our public service workers who do dangerous and stressful work are properly supported by our government.” — Stephanie Smith, BCGEU President

February 22, 2016

"Ontario now joins Alberta and Manitoba with legislation that creates the presumption that when first responders are diagnosed with PTSD it is work-related," said James Clancy, NUPGE National President.