Joan Jessome | National Union of Public and General Employees

Joan Jessome

February 25, 2016

"The Premier and the Minister of Health have to step back and start addressing the real issues facing patient care and health care providers — one of the major issues being nurse- to-patient ratios.” — Joan Jessome, NSGEU President

February 3, 2016

“We have an obligation to ensure the safety and well-being of both our own members and these youth. It’s only a matter of time before we have a tragedy on our hands at Comhla Cruinn." — Joan Jessome, NSGEU President

January 25, 2016

Members "want to have a chance to negotiate with their employer, have their issues heard, and vote on an agreement that hasn’t been dictated to them by Premier McNeil." — Joan Jessome, NSGEU President

December 7, 2015

 “Our members are telling us they need more information and time before they vote on this tentative agreement.” — Joan Jessome, NSGEU President

November 27, 2015

"It is very telling that this bill was brought forward by the Minister of Business, not the Minister Responsible for the Liquor Control Act.” — Joan Jessome, NSGEU President

November 13, 2015

“The committee is incredibly disappointed by the lack of respect the McNeil government has shown for the spirit of the collective bargaining process." — Joan Jessome, NSGEU President

November 4, 2015

“This lack of disclosure makes us wonder if the government truly is sincere when they say they want to work with unions to find cost savings." — Joan Jessome, NSGEU President 

October 26, 2015

"If the Premier is truly concerned about growing the economy, why would his government seek widespread concessions and takeaways that will greatly reduce the buying power of so many customers of small businesses.” — Joan Jessome, NSGEU President

October 13, 2015

“While the union cannot speak to the investigation of Mr. Lavin, I feel I must speak out and question whether it truly warranted terrorizing a family in their own home.” — Joan Jessome, President, NSGEU

September 24, 2015

Despite shrinking government revenue through stalled wages and selling off public services, the Nova Scotia government continues to privatize.