education | National Union of Public and General Employees

education

June 3, 2015

NUPGE Statement on the Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Thanks to a long line of reports and commissions, culminating this week with a landmark report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, we know the truth about Canada's residential schools for Indigenous children and families. 

Now, finally, it is time for the reconciliation to begin.

April 21, 2015

Vocational instructors back bargaining proposals with support for strike. 

April 16, 2015

Instead of accepting even more cutbacks, Public Interest Alberta is urging citizens to use the opportunity of this important election to advocate for these priorities for change, which will result in stronger community services supported by more equitable taxation policies.

April 14, 2015

The new collective agreement includes a wage increase of at least 5.5 per cent over the life of the contract, local improvements and language that better supports the faculty’s work.

November 3, 2014

“We ask that government take an honest approach to restructuring the school board system that respects existing collective agreements and school board employees and does not legislate away labour rights in order to dictate their own terms." — Joan Jessome, NSGEU President.

September 2, 2014

"I want to congratulate college faculty on negotiating a tentative contract that helps to protect and enshrine quality education for students." — Warren (Smokey) Thomas, OPSEU President. 

August 28, 2014

Poll finds British Columbians want the province to invest in students' education and their teachers.

July 2, 2014

 “Losing these good jobs, affects not only the staff members but their families and the communities in which they live and the stores they shop at.” — Joan Jessome, NSGEU President.

June 27, 2014

 “Support staff do the work that is not seen but is necessary to keep the schools functioning.”— Joan Jessome, NSGEU President.

May 21, 2014

A 2009 Finance department chart estimates that if Ottawa spent $1 billion on support for unemployed and low-income individuals, it would generate 18,755 jobs. The same chart shows that if Ottawa gave up $1 billion in revenue in corporate income tax reductions, this would create only 3,310 jobs.