New essential services legislation doesn't erase harm done to Saskatchewan workers

“The Premier should offer a sincere apology for his government’s reckless actions and for the harm done to union members and all working people." — Bob Bymoen, SGEU President

Regina (21 Oct. 2015) — New proposed essential services legislation introduced by the Saskatchewan Party government on October 15 does not erase the harm done to tens of thousands of Saskatchewan workers who were stripped of their right to collective bargaining for seven years, according to Bob Bymoen, President of the Saskatchewan Government and General Employees' Union (SGEU/NUPGE).

Supreme Court ordered the Saskatchewan government to treat workers fairly 

“The government had to be forced by the Supreme Court of Canada to treat workers fairly,” noted Bymoen. “Working families lost the ability to engage in meaningful collective bargaining as a result of the now-illegal Public Service Essential Services Act.”

“Tremendous effort and resources had to be marshalled by unions to counter this attack on public service workers. No group of citizens should be forced to go to such lengths to protect their basic constitutional rights,” adds Bymoen.

SGEU says Premier Wall should apologize to working families

Premier Wall should take responsibility for the injustice done by his government to Saskatchewan working families.

“The Premier should offer a sincere apology for his government’s reckless actions and for the harm done to union members and all working people,” according to Bymoen.

SGEU/NUPGE will be closely examining Bill 183, which sets out new rules for handling essential services, but it is too early to assess the impact on union members, says Bymoen.

NUPGE

The National Union of Public and General Employees (NUPGE) is one of Canada's largest labour organizations with over 360,000 members. Our mission is to improve the lives of working families and to build a stronger Canada by ensuring our common wealth is used for the common good. NUPGE

NUPGE Components: 

Issues and Campaigns: